Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World


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This must be the place

Well, a lot. I felt small having not done anything big from a tech perspective.


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But I too have felt ripples of someone losing a job to a code that I p I should maybe stick to my rule of not rating any tech books here. But I too have felt ripples of someone losing a job to a code that I put in. Lets not go there. A very interesting read for a techie.

Should be interesting for others as well to understand what is going on. May 14, Azzaz rated it it was amazing. Nov 29, Allan rated it liked it. Chapter 7 entitled Categorizing Humankind enters the nebulous world of personality inventories. Excepting astrology, these all have a grain of truth. Often a grainy grain. I regard personality as a messy ball of string.

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Just about any halfway sensible metric is tangent to a bundle of threads somewhere in the ball of string. There's a thousand ways to cover the personality food groups, and a dozen companies with fat binders and seminars to convince you otherwise.

My own "one meal to rule them all" would consist of bacon, mushrooms, parsley, shrimp, and Parmesan in a white wine reduction. Against this standard, I could assess everything else I eat.

Clearly an astronaut should have a lot of bacon, yet not too much parsley or white wine. Your creative type at IDEO would have much of these, less of the others. Turns out that reflections-driven people who would rather think about what could be than what is are almost non-existent within NASA's manned space program. They might perhaps have applied next door. This chapter presents the work of these psychologists as the beginning point on an arc of technology leading to automated personality detection bots deployed in corporate call centers.

It's a clearly identifiable sub-genre, alongside the sister genres of Freak-porn Freakonomics and Glad-porn Malcolm Gladwell. On this handy pornventory, Steiner fashions his narratives from bacon and parsley.

Automate This (Audiobook) by Christopher Steiner | dunnrophorib.tk

The bacon sometimes degenerates into bacon-bits, if you dig into the hard stuff a little deeper. Nevertheless, it's an entertaining read. A tip of the hat for directing me to a personality inventory one can actually use: the Right Stuff opinionated team players , the Wrong Stuff competitive bickerers and back-biters , and No Stuff neurotics, dreamers and back-benchers. Mar 07, Keith rated it liked it Shelves: social-commentary , Some harsh reviews here on GoodReads - too journalistic, too superficial.

Nevertheless, for dummies like me this was an enjoyable discovery of the many, many ways algorithms are influencing our lives. The idea of a "bot" as your doctor is quite attractive given the ever-increasing levels of complexity and change that your average general practitioner must master in order to give -hopefully - an accurate diagnosis of a patient complaint.

The inside story of tracking down the exact chords that ope Some harsh reviews here on GoodReads - too journalistic, too superficial. The inside story of tracking down the exact chords that open The Beatles song "Help," apparently a long held mystery, with algorithms is fascinating. Some of the older Wall Street hacks are interesting and demonstrative of a rebellious entrepreneurial spirit, the guy who hacked the NASDAQ machine is one example or the people who built their own private dark fiber network between New York and Chicago is another.

What Chris Steiner does, and this is, I think, the core of the book, is to irrevocably demonstrate what happened when Wall Street set out to rule the world with algorithms. Faster and faster transactions and increasingly bizarre financial instruments CDOs anyone? By early , automated bots accounted for 60 percent of all U. Wall Street had grown to become a larger hirer of math, engineering, and science graduates than the semiconductor industry, Big Pharma, or the telecommunications business. This is a changes of focus to using data for ends more social than financial.

Steiner is not all apple pie and roses carefully noting some of the inherent problems that a data-driven society must be aware of. A readable tale of changes affecting us all. Jul 31, Maree rated it really liked it.

Automate This

A fascinating glimpse into the future as well as the open secret world of bots that quietly exists around us today. While I thought I was pretty up on technology, there were still algorithms that I hadn't realize existed, such as ones that compose music, or the ones that match you to similar personalities in a call center. It's amazing, and perhaps a little scary. But as the author says, they aren't going away any time soon, and I believe that they have the capability for a lot of good.

I really A fascinating glimpse into the future as well as the open secret world of bots that quietly exists around us today. I really got blocked in chapter two when the history of man and math popped up. It was a little much for my english major brain.

America is automating

But after that, the real world examples of what code and algorithms are doing, starting in the stock market and graduating to the future of healthcare, is definitely worth absorbing. Another great point was the section on NASA astronaut training. I may have to look it up. I'd definitely say that I lead with thoughts-based. I obviously missed my calling.

Should have became a quant and earned millions. Guess that's what I get for taking the easy way out. The end of the book talks about how everyone should take a programming class in school. Jan 11, Andrea James rated it liked it Shelves: decision-making , general. As a number of the other Goodreads reviewers have mentioned, this is like an extended magazine article, albeit a rather enjoyable one I reckon.

The book is light reading and doesn't go into the technical side of algorithms but I thought the author told the stories relatively well in a typical Malcolm Gladwell way, a style that seems to dominate popular science books these days. I picked up in this book because bots are getting increasing better at making decisions and it's interesting to learn As a number of the other Goodreads reviewers have mentioned, this is like an extended magazine article, albeit a rather enjoyable one I reckon.

I picked up in this book because bots are getting increasing better at making decisions and it's interesting to learn examples when computers are being used - either to do jobs that humans were never able to do or to replace the ones that we used to do. We often think of computers as doing non-creative, repetitive calculations but the algorithms that engineers have been developing are really quite incredible.

From composing music which people aren't able to distinguish from human compositions to listening into our phone calls so that they can match us up with a call centre agent who is better suited our personality. The latter may need more work from my experience : Understanding how people make decisions feeds into machine learning but also the opposite is also true. By crunching the data on millions of decisions made, computers are able show patterns of our behaviour and show up what people actually do not what they say they intend to do.

We can even monitor, analyse and record our own individual choices so that we can more honestly assess and improve our decisions. Well, until the machines completely take over our lives that is! All in all, it's a fun book especially if you are relatively new to this topic. Oct 04, Fee rated it it was amazing.

This was an excellent book of explaining how our modern world is perishing with ways to become rich, as computers and programming are taking our jobs. It starts off explaining the life of Petterfy who was ahead of his time with knowing computers and programming before it was known by only the biggest businesses in the sixties. It wasn't till later that he showed the stock market that you did not have to be there to control it.

The book continued with explaining other cool examples. Beatles Algor This was an excellent book of explaining how our modern world is perishing with ways to become rich, as computers and programming are taking our jobs. Beatles Algorithm: Person could tell from first few cords if song was written by John or Paul.

Online dating algorithm explains the real odds is once the relationship starts, not how you meet or what you have in common. Hammerbacher was last character mentioned, went to school as an English major and changed to Math at Harvard, needed to be stimulated with the top information as he was hired by sucker berg during early developments of facebook, but got bored.

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He even talks about baseball and its algoritms, but I can leave that to you to read. Great read. Anything is better than Infinite Jest and talking about canadians, bostonians, and tennis all day.

Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World

Feb 18, Jim rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , technical. Really thought-provoking book about how mathematical algorithms, coupled with any given current technology at a time in history, has led to massive efficiencies and gains - starting with the algorithm's pioneer s and eventually spreading to everyone. The key areas the author focuses on: Wall Street and Finance, Hollywood, the music industry, customer service call centers, and of course social media.

The author also devotes a small chunk of the book to giving credit to key mathematicians through Really thought-provoking book about how mathematical algorithms, coupled with any given current technology at a time in history, has led to massive efficiencies and gains - starting with the algorithm's pioneer s and eventually spreading to everyone. Although the material is hardly "light reading", the author does a very good job of conveying heavy mathematical and technological concepts through examples, and also by way of leaving out unnecessary, confusing details that only small groups of people would even begin to understand.

May 05, Rohan rated it liked it. This is a much better book than I had originally expected it would be. Although it is not technical at all, the Author did manage to present the brief history behind algorithms and its various applications in our daily life in an engaging manner. I really liked parts of the book where Author mentions how Algorithms have come to play an important role for Wall Street and people who have worked for them. There are lot of interesting people mentioned in the book - Thomas Peterffy, Nathan Mayer Roth This is a much better book than I had originally expected it would be.

Perhaps the major drawback of the book as has been pointed here by multiple reviewers is the lack of in-depth analysis of various problems for which we depend on Algorithms now. Other than that, I think this is a good one time read. May 13, Thom rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction. The author notes how Wall Street brought algorithms into the mainstream, how when Wall Street crashed that other fields had a sudden influx of quantitative talent, and how algorithms will soon take over everything.

Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World
Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World
Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World
Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World
Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World
Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World
Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World
Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World Automate This: How Algorithms Took Over Our Markets, Our Jobs, and the World

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